Anti-Doping Program

Canadian Bodybuilding Federation (CBBF) Anti-Doping Program

1.1 Doping Control has become an integral part of provincial and national bodybuilding and fitness sports. It ensures that athletes compete on a level playing surface without the assistance of performance enhancing substances. In furtherance of this, members of the CBBF eligible for selection to the IFBB International Events agree to submit to selected drug testing, at either provincially selected events or the qualifying event for Team Canada selection.

1.2 The Anti-Doping Program, hereinafter called the “Program”, provides written guidelines to ensure that the Doping Control process is conducted in a standardized and professional manner throughout the CBBF.

1.3 The CBBF fully endorses the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) World AntiDoping Code

1.4 The Program provides specific details on athlete notification, sample collection, sample analysis and reporting, determination of doping offences, result management, including protest and reinstatement procedures, and other issues related to Doping Control. The primary objective of the Program is to maintain the security, integrity, and identity of the sample and therefore, the validity and reliability of the test results. Variations or departures from the Program shall not necessarily invalidate the test results unless they can be shown, on a balance of probabilities, to cast doubt on the validity and reliability of the test results.

Article 2 – The Program

2.1 The Program shall be followed on all occasions where Doping Control is conducted at CBBF Events.

2.2 The Program may be used by the Provincial Associations to assist in organizing and conducting Doping Control within their jurisdiction. The Program may also serve as a reference for Doping Control Officers who are responsible for managing the Doping Control collection process and other technical personnel associated with Doping Control.

2.3 The CBBF requires that only a WADA accredited laboratory shall be used to analyze all urine samples.

2.4 Throughout the Program, the expression “Prohibited Classes of Substances and Prohibited Methods” (Prohibited List) refers to the list of doping classes and methods prohibited by WADA. This includes pharmacological classes of drugs such as anabolic steroids and diuretics, doping methods such as pharmacological, chemical and physical manipulation. This information is available on the World Wide Web at www.olympic.org , www.wada-ama.org

2.5 In case of a dispute over the substances and methods listed in the “List of Prohibited Substances and Methods” manual the list provided by WADA shall take precedence over all others.

Article 3 – Authority

3.1 The authority to implement the Program lies in the CBBF Constitution, Bylaws and Rules, which establish a mandate for the CBBF to implement the Program at the national amateur level and to assist the Provincial Associations in implementing the Program.

3.2 The CBBF may contract with an individual or organization to carry out the Program on behalf of the CBBF. This Authorized Sample Collection Provider (ASCP) would be mandated by the CBBF to implement and supervise the Program, including the collection of samples and to assist the Provincial Associations in implementing their own programs.

3.2 Provincial Associations must ensure that when they conduct doping control events they have the power to implement their own programs and to impose sanctions upon athlete-members. This power may already be provided for within the constitution and rules of the Provincial Association or through the adoption of a suitable national-level program.

Article 4 – Position Statement

4.1 The sport of bodybuilding and fitness involves physical health and fitness, mental application and dedication to training. The use of prohibited substances and other doping methods to artificially enhance performance is unethical, contrary to the concept of fair play, undermines the values of sport, and can endanger the health of the athletes.

4.2 The practice of doping is forbidden. No person who is subject to the Program shall engage in a doping offence or assist, encourage or otherwise be a party to a doping offence.

4.3 The CBBF fully supports the fight against doping in sport and therefore condemns the use of prohibited substances and methods in an attempt to gain a pharmacological advantage in sport competition. The CBBF joins with its national sports colleagues in striving to eradicate the use of prohibited substances and methods in sport.

Article 5 – Definition of Doping

5.1 Doping contravenes the ethics of both sport and medical science. Doping consists in the administration of substances belonging to the prohibited classes of pharmacological agents and/or in the use of various prohibited methods as listed in WADA’s “List of Prohibited Substances and Methods. 5.2 The anti-doping campaign is founded on three basic principles: 1. Respect for medical and sports ethics; 2. Protection of the health of athletes; and  The assurance of an equal playing field for all athletes during competition.

Article 6 – Application

6.1 The Program applies to: 1. Any CBBF athlete competing in any CBBF Event, under the direct jurisdiction and sanction of the CBBF;

6.2 For any in-competition and out-of-competition testing not conducted by the CBBF, the program of the relevant Provincial Association will apply so long as it conforms to this Program.

6.3 If a Provincial Association does not have its own program, this Program will apply.

6.4 By registering to compete in a CBBF Event, the athlete agrees to be bound by the CBBF Constitution, By Laws and Rules, and this Program.

Article 7 – Objects of the Program

7.1 The objects of the Program are: 1. To eradicate doping within the sport of bodybuilding and fitness through the provision and implementation of an effective national doping control program.

2. To assist the Provincial Associations in implementing their own effective doping control programs;

3. To provide the method of determining whether a doping offence has occurred;

4. To provide for sanctions to be applied in the case of an individual being found guilty of having committed a doping offence;

5. To provide for a fair protest process in the case of an individual who believes that he or she has been wrongly accused of a doping offence;

6. To detail the responsibility of athletes, officials and Provincial Associations in addressing the “drugs in sport” issue concerning drug testing programs, education programs, and the provision of information on the issue.

7.2 The CBBF believes that education is of paramount importance in the fight against doping in sport. To this end, the CBBF will regularly distribute educational articles on the dangers of drug use and abuse, and on healthy alternatives, the IFBB. The CBBF will provide links to anti-doping materials, such as WADA, IOC and OMADC websites.

Article 8 – Prohibited Substances and Prohibited Methods

8.1 The CBBF prohibits the presence of any substance or method banned by WADA as identified its “List of Prohibited Substances and Methods” (Prohibited List).

8.2 Samples may be analyzed for the following classes of substances and methods: 1. Prohibited Classes of Substances a. Stimulants b. Narcotic Analgesics c. Anabolic Agents d. Diuretics e. Peptide Hormones, Mimetics, and Analogues

2. Prohibited Methods

a. Blood Doping

b. Administering Artificial Oxygen Carriers or Plasma Expanders

c. Pharmacological, Chemical, and Physical Manipulation

Article 9 – Doping Offence

9.1 For the purpose of the Program, a doping offence includes when:

1. An individual is found to be positive for the presence of a prohibited or restricted substance, marker or metabolite;

2. An individual is found to have used a prohibited method;

3. An individual refuses to comply with a request to provide a sample for testing when requested to do so by a properly authorized doping control authority;

4. An individual who, having been properly notified of a doping control, fails to present himself or herself for testing as directed.

5. An individual assists another individual in committing, or is knowingly involved in committing, a doping offence; or

6. An individual deals or traffics in prohibited substances. 9.2 A doping offence may also be committed if a Certificate of Analysis from a WADA accredited laboratory subsequently reports that one or more of its athletes participating in a Provincial Association Program has returned an “A” sample Positive Test Result while participating at a CBBF Event. 9.3 Any individual or association to whom the Program applies who is found guilty of having committed a doping offence shall be liable to sanctions as outlined in this Program.

Article 10 – Definitions

10.1 The following definitions are used in this document: 1. “Athlete-Member” means any person who is a bona-fide competitive amateur member of the CBBF or a Provincial Association affiliated to the CBBF.

2. “ASCP”, or Authorized Sample Collection Provider, means an individual or organization that is authorized by the CBBF to deliver its Anti-Drug Program

3. “CBBF” means the Canadian Bodybuilding Federation, being a national sport governing body for the sport of bodybuilding and fitness.

4. “CBBF Executive Representative”, CER, means the CBBF executive responsible for the co-ordination of the Program.

5. “Collection Vessel” means a sealed, sterile plastic container used to hold the athlete’s urine during the voiding process.

6. “Competitor” means any registered entrant in a national amateur event sanctioned by the CBBF or any of its affiliated Provincial Associations. Registration shall normally take place at the Official Weigh-in/Height Measurement and takes effect immediately when the athlete has weighed-in or has his or her height determined AND is officially registered as a competitor by the CBBF officials.

7. “Courier” means the person in charge of the transportation of samples collected at the competition or other venue and sent to the Doping Control Laboratory per WADA approved processes.

8. “Doping Control Laboratory” means the relevant WADA accredited laboratory.

9. “Doping Control Notification Form” means a form used for keeping a record of the notification procedure. The form consists of one original and one copy. The original is given to the DCO. The copy is given to the competitor. The DCO may waive the use of this form where the situation warrants.

10. “Doping Control Officer”, DCO, includes the Doping Control Technical Officer and means a competent individual who is in charge of and responsible for the Doping Control Station. It is not a prerequisite that the Doping Control Officer be a medical doctor but that he or she is experienced in conducting doping controls as established by WADA.

11. “Doping Control Official Record” means a form used for keeping a record of the sample collection procedure. The form consists of one original and two copies. The original is given to the DCO. One copy is sent to the laboratory with the urine sample; the competitor retains the other copy. This form may also be known as the “Doping Control Form”.

12. “Doping Control Station” means an area of restricted access where Doping Control is being conducted and includes the voiding area, administrative area (also called the “consulting area”) and waiting area.

13. “Doping Control Technical Officer” means a person who supervises the notification and sample collection procedures. The Doping Control Technical Officer takes instructions from the Doping Control Officer. Where the situation warrants, the DCO may assume these responsibilities.

14. “Escort” means a person responsible for delivering the Doping Control Notification Form, where applicable, to the selected competitor. This person will also accompany the competitor and watch him or her continuously until they reach the Doping Control Station. The Escort takes instructions from the Doping Control Officer.

15. “IFBB” means the International Federation of Body Building

16. “IOC” means the International Olympic Committee, being an association created by the Congress of Paris on June 23, 1894 and which is entrusted with the control and development of the modern Olympic Games.

17. “Provincial Association” means a provincial sport governing body for the sport of bodybuilding and fitness that is affiliated to the CBBF based on one such Association per province.

18. “Partial Sample Kit” means a plastic bag containing one urine bottle with cap and one shipping container. The Partial Sample Kit is used for the temporary storage of the urine sample when the total urine volume produced by the competitor is less than the requested minimum quantity of 75 ml.

19. “Technical Delegate” The Technical Delegate is assigned by the CBBF or the appropriate Provincial Association or organizing committee as its official representative. He or she is responsible for doping control at the designated competition and will work in conjunction with the Doping Control Officer.

20. “Therapeutic Use Exemption” Athletes may have illnesses or conditions that require them to take particular medications. If the medication an athlete is required to take to treat an illness or condition happens to fall under the Prohibited List, a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) may give that athlete the authorization to take the needed medicine.

21. “Transport Container” means a bag into which the shipping containers can be placed for transportation to the laboratory. It is secured with a plastic seal.

22. “Urine Control Kit” means a plastic bag containing two urine bottles with caps, one marked “A”, and one marked “B”, and two shipping containers. The shipping containers are plastic containers for shipping and storing the urine bottles and are sealed with a system that ensures that they are tamper proof. One shipping container is used for sample “A” and the other shipping container is used for sample “B”. The bottle labels show the minimum levels of urine they must contain and the code number. The shipping containers are tagged with a code number, the number being the same as the bottle labels.

23. “WADA” means the World Anti-Doping Agency and it is an international independent agency composed and funded equally by the sport movement and governments of the world. Its key activities include scientific research, education, development of anti-doping capacities, and monitoring of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) – the document harmonizing anti-doping policies in all sports and all countries

24. “WADA accredited laboratory” means a laboratory approved by the WADA to analyze urine samples provided by athletes.

Article 11 – Authorities and Procedures

11.1 Doping Control is the responsibility of the CBBF. The CBBF may delegate its responsibilities to such person or persons as they may designate, at their discretion.

11.2 The CBBF shall reserve the right to nominate and select an outside AntiDoping Agency to act as its duly appointed Doping Control representative.

11.3 A Doping Control Officer or Authorized Sample Collection Provider conducting testing on behalf of the CBBF will be authorized to conduct such testing upon the approval of the DCO, or his representative.

11.4 The CBBF shall recognize drug test results from tests conducted independently, or on behalf of the CBBF.

11.5 Where there has been some variation from the Program’s procedures for doping control, the test results will stand unless the variation concerned casts doubt, based on a balance of probability, on the security, integrity, and identity of the sample and therefore, on the validity and reliability of the test results.

11.6 Any sanction imposed by the Provincial Association shall comply with the minimum sanctions as outlined in this Program

11.7 An athlete-member, while under sanction for a doping offence, shall not be permitted to participate in any CBBF activity throughout the full period of the sanction, to include competing, coaching, giving seminars or exhibitions, officiating, organizing competitions, applying for professional status, or holding any administrative position within the CBBF or any of its affiliated Provincial Associations. Every Provincial Association shall be bound to honor those sanctions duly imposed by the CBBF or any of its Provincial Associations.

Article 12 – Accredited Laboratory

12.1 A WADA accredited laboratory shall analyze all samples taken pursuant to this Program. The CBBF shall select the specific laboratory on an as-required basis.

Article 13 – Procedures for Conducting In-Competition Doping Control

13.1 Competition doping control is defined as announced tests that are conducted at CBBF Events and may consist of compulsory testing of the top individual winner of each of the event classes, or pre-determined number not to exceed the top three individual winners of each of the event classes.

13.2 Every athlete, as a condition of membership, shall agree to abide by the rules of the sport, including participation without the use of prohibited substances or methods as identified by WADA’s “List of Prohibited Substances and Methods”.

13.3 Every athlete, as a condition to participation in CBBF Events, or a provincial national qualifier agrees to submit him or herself to doping control.

13.4 Doping control at competitions may be conducted for the full WADA “List Prohibited Substances and Methods”. Any positive results shall be reported and governed by the provisions of this Program.

13.5 At its discretion, the CBBF shall conduct doping control at CCBF Events under its direct jurisdiction and sanction.

13.6 The DCO and CER shall be responsible for ensuring that doping control is conducted at these events.

13.7 The CER shall decide the number of competitors who will be subjected to doping control at a competition. The CER shall also be responsible for the actual selection of the athletes together with the Doping Control Officer and Technical Delegate.

13.8 A competitor who is seriously injured may be excused from doping control by decision of the CER, after consultation with the Doping Control Officer.

13.9 The CBBF reserves the right to add or remove athletes to be tested at its National World Qualifier.

Article 14 – Responsibilities of the CBBF 14.1 The CBBF shall:

1. Fully support the ideals of the Olympic Movement as demonstrated by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and WADA. In so doing, the CBBF adheres to the WADA World Anti-Doping Code.

2. Implement a doping control program for CBBF Doping Control Events, provincial events and for out of competition situations.

3. Promulgate rules, regulations, guidelines, and directives for doping control.

4. Maintain and update, as required, the CBBF Anti-Doping Program manual.

5. Determine the number of athletes selected for doping control.

6. Assist the Provincial Associations in establishing their own doping control programs.

7. Receive the laboratory Certificate of Analysis and issue letters of notification of doping control results.

8. Apply and enforce sanctions on athlete-members and Provincial Associations who are found guilty of having committed a doping offence.

9. Establish protest procedures for athlete-members and Provincial Associations who wish to protest doping control results or sanctions.

10. Provide its athletes with information respecting the Program upon registration for events and on its website and will ensure that appropriate educational information respecting the Program and the use and abuse of performance enhancing substances and healthy alternatives is provided through web materials, seminars or workshops at events.

11. Incorporate an annual test plan including budgeting, as part of its ongoing work plan.

12. The responsibility for athletes’ education is assigned to the CBBF Vice Chairperson Operations and Drug Control.

Article 15 – Responsibilities of the Provincial Associations

15.1 The Provincial Associations shall: 1. Where possible, implement anti-doping programs at the provincial level

2. Advise their athlete-members that doping control shall be conducted at CBBF Events.

3. Ensure that they send only those they know to be drug-free athletes to participate in CBBF Doping and/or IFBB- recognized international amateur events.

4. Cooperate fully with the Doping Control authorities in ensuring the efficient and effective implementation of the Doping Control procedures conducted at the event.

5. Educate their athlete-members on the dangers of drug use and abuse and provide regular informative literature on healthy alternatives.

6. Maintain an up-to-date and accurate database of all Provincial Team athletes, who may qualify to compete at the CBBF National World Qualifier.

Article 16 – Responsibilities of the Technical Delegate

16.1 The Technical Delegate is assigned by the CBBF or the appropriate Provincial Association or organizing committee and is its official representative. He or she is responsible for doping control at the designated competition as described below:

1. Liaise with the competition organizing committee and advise on matters pertaining to the requirements for the Doping Control Station.

2. Coordinate the setup of the Doping Control Station before the competition with advice from the Doping Control Officer.

3. Assist the Doping Control Officer in administering any random or pre scheduled doping control selections.

4. Inform the Doping Control Officer of any special circumstances pertaining to the sport that may affect this Program.

Article 17 – Responsibilities of the Organizing Committee

17.1 The competition organizing committee, at the direction of the CBBF or Provincial Organization and on advice from the Technical Delegate, shall:

1. Provide adequate facilities and equipment as outlined in this Program.

2. Provide Escorts with suitable identification for appropriate venue access, an event schedule, map of the venue, clipboards, and pens.

3. Ensure that an adequate number of volunteers are available to work with the Doping Control Officer.

4. Ensure that the Doping Control Station staff has accommodation (if necessary) and transportation to and from the competition venue.

17.2 In coordination with the CBBF make arrangements for an educational workshop or seminar respecting the Program, doping and healthy alternatives.

Article 18 – Responsibilities of the Doping Control Officer

18.1 The Doping Control Officer shall liaise with the Technical Delegate on all sport-technical related matters for all aspects of doping control at competitions. Doping Control should not be carried out if conditions are inadequate to reasonably ensure the security, integrity, and identity of the sample. It is therefore the responsibility of the Doping Control Officer to approve the Doping Control Station. Should equipment, supplies, personnel, or facility be deemed inadequate for secure sample collection, the Doping Control Officer(s) shall have the authority to cancel doping control, for the event if it is mutually agreed upon between the DCO and the CBBF.

18.2 Prior to the event, the Doping Control Officer shall:

1. Contact the Technical Delegate and, if necessary, visit the venue to advise on all advance preparations for doping control;

2. Ensure that the Doping Control Station is duly equipped and fit for work, including the preparation for assistants, in accordance with this Program;

3. Brief all Doping Control Station staff and Escorts as to their duties and responsibilities;

4. Arrange or perform notification and escorting of athletes;

5. Ensure that the athlete’s rights and responsibilities are explained.

6. Explain, or arrange explanation of, the doping control process to athletes and athlete representatives, as necessary;

7. Ensure that the doping control equipment has arrived and that all necessary documents and supplies are in good repair;

8. Check with the Technical Delegate to review the criteria for random athlete selection for doping control and administer random selections with the Technical Delegate; and 18.3

During the event, the Doping Control Officer shall:

1. Ensure that entry to the Doping Control Station is controlled and that the sample collection areas are secure;

2. Supervise the Doping Control Station staff;

3. Accurately and thoroughly complete all relevant documentation, in particular the Doping Control Official Record;

4. Record any irregularities that occur during the collection procedures and report these irregularities to the CBBF;

5. Receive and record all verbal or written complaints concerning possible violations of the Program. All complaints shall be submitted to the CBBF; and

6. Secure all samples and all doping control collection equipment.

18.4 Following the event, the Doping Control Officer shall:

1. Seal the Transport Container containing the samples and record all code numbers on the appropriate report forms;

2. Send the samples by courier to the designated WADA accredited laboratory for analysis;

3. Submit a Doping Control Officer’s Report, including any problems or complaints that may have occurred, to the CBBF;

4. Return all documentation, equipment and unused seals to the appropriate authority according to the instructions provided; and

5. Submit an expense claim and honoraria claim to the appropriate authority.

Article 19 – Responsibilities of the Escort

19.1 The responsibilities of the Escorts shall be as follows:

1. Before the event, the Escorts shall be briefed by the Doping Control Officer on the procedures for notifying (where applicable) and escorting athletes to the Doping Control Station

2. Before the event, a list of procedures, a map of the competition site, a schedule of events, and a clipboard and pen should be given to each Escort;

3. Each Escort shall be provided with proper identification;

4. Before the Escort’s designated events, the Escort will report to the Doping Control Officer in order to receive an envelope containing the criteria for identifying the athlete(s) selected for doping control;

5. At the applicable time, the Escort will present the athlete with the Doping Control Notification Form (if applicable). The athlete shall read and sign the form. The Escort shall record the time of notification and print his or her name in the space provided. The escort shall accompany the athlete and they shall report to the Doping Control Station within the time limit as noted on the Doping Control Notification Form. The athlete shall be warned of the possible consequences should he or she refuse to sign the Doping Control Notification Form or fail to report to the Doping Control Station within the given time limit;

6. The Escort will accompany the athlete at all times until his or her arrival at the Doping Control Station;

7. At the discretion of the Doping Control Officer, the athlete shall be afforded a reasonable opportunity to summon a coach, doctor, team official, or other representative to accompany him or her to the Doping Control Station; and

8. The Escort shall report any irregularities to the Doping Control Officer when delivering the Doping Control Notification Form.

Note: In certain circumstances, the Doping Control Notification Form may not be required e.g. in situations where the selected athlete is immediately escorted to the Doping Control Station.

19.2 The escort shall be the same sex as the athlete selected for testing.

Article 20 – Responsibilities of the Athlete

20.1 The responsibilities of the Athlete shall be as follows: 1. When selected for competition random drug testing or compulsory testing of the finalists, the athlete shall accept the Doping Control Notification Form (if applicable).

2. The athlete shall acknowledge, in writing, receipt of the form. The exact time of the notification shall be entered on the form.

3. Athletes selected for doping control shall report to and register at the Doping Control Station within the time limit stated on the Doping Control Notification Form. The athletes shall be required to provide valid proof of identity (e.g. passport) upon entering the Doping Control Station.

4. An athlete may be allowed to leave the Doping Control Station with the consent of the Doping Control Officer on the condition that the athlete be accompanied at all times by an Escort e.g. for an award presentation.

5. An official representative of the athlete or team concerned may accompany athletes selected for doping control to the Doping Control Station. This representative shall also present valid proof of identity (e.g. passport) and shall have the right to remain at the Doping Control Station throughout the entire procedure except that he or she shall not be permitted to witness the actual voiding process.

6. The Doping Control Officer shall fill in the initial information on the Doping Control Official Record.

7. The Doping Control Officer shall explain the sample collection procedures to each athlete and any accompanying representative.

8. An athlete selected for doping control, or his or her representative, may formally register a complaint in writing about the conduct of the doping control procedures to the Doping Control Officer at any time during the procedure. The registration of such a complaint is not justification for refusal to participate in the doping control procedure. An athlete’s complaint shall be submitted by the Doping Control Officer to the CBBF or the ASCP. 9. Athletes will provide samples as directed.

10. Athletes will be requested to provide a second or subsequent sample if the pH or specific gravity levels are not within the acceptable range. All samples shall be cross-referenced and sent to the laboratory.

11. Refusal or failure by an athlete to follow proper doping control procedures shall be reported to the DCO. Such a refusal or failure shall be deemed to be a doping offence.

12. The athlete and the accompanying representative shall remain in the Doping Control Station waiting area until the athlete is called into the consulting area.

13. The athlete and any personnel belongings he or she, or the accompanying representative, may bring with them (clothing, bags, etc) may be searched for evidence of manipulation, upon entering and leaving the Doping Control Station.

14. No photographs, video or tape recordings may be taken inside the Doping Control Station during the sample collection process; and

15. The media shall not have access to the Doping Control Station at any time. Article 21 Out of Competition Testing 1. A Provincial Association may utilize an out of competition testing program that must conform with this Program.

2. The CBBF will not itself test athletes on an out of competition basis at this time.

Article 22 – Responsibilities of the CBBF Executive Representative (CER)

22.1 The CER, shall: 1. Ensure that the testing agency is in possession of all of the applicable equipment and documents necessary to conduct doping control.

Article 23 – Responsibilities of the Provincial Associations

23.1 The Provincial Associations shall be responsible for:

1. Providing an updated database of all eligible athletes within their jurisdiction including passport number, name, address, and telephone number. This database must be updated as needed. 2. Keep their athletes informed of the Program. 3. Provide information to their athletes respecting the issues of drug use and cheating through the use of performance enhancing substances.

Article 24 – Athlete Testing Pool for Doping Control

24.1 Every athlete, who will be eligible to compete at CBBF Events, shall agree to abide by the rules of the sport. One of these rules is participation without the use of substances or methods as identified in the WADA “List of Prohibited Substances and Methods”.

24.2 Every athlete, as a condition to participation in CBBF Events, agrees to submit him or herself to doping control. 24.3 Athletes may be drawn from the following competitive levels:

1. All National Team athletes competing in IFBB-sanctioned amateur World-level events;

2. All National Team athletes competing in the CBBF Events.

24.4 Updated information shall be maintained on each athlete as identified above by each Provincial Association. The CBBF shall be provided with and shall maintain an accurate, up-to-date database of every athlete competing in the above-mentioned events.

Article 25 – Sample Collection Procedures

It must be emphasized that the primary objective of these procedures is to ensure the security, integrity, and identity of the sample. Although adherence to these procedures is recommended, the fundamental objective is to maintain the validity and reliability of the tests and to adhere to the principles of the process. Departures from these procedures shall not invalidate the test results unless they cast doubt on the validity and reliability of the results.

25.1 The CBBF procedures for competitor notification and registration may differ from those of set out by WADA due to the characteristics of the sport of bodybuilding and fitness. However, these differences have no bearing on the security, integrity, and identity of the sample, or on the validity and reliability of the test results.

25.2 A certain number of competitors may be selected at random during the weigh-in/height measurement, subsequent to providing proof of their identity via their passport. The selected competitors are under the constant observation of a Doping Control Escort, from the moment of the random selection to the moment of arrival at the Doping Control Station, where the Doping Control Officer, via their passport, again verifies their identity.

25.3 At the CBBF Event, each weight class winner, will immediately exit the stage after the Award Ceremony and are under the constant observation of a Doping Control Escort who escorts them directly to the Doping Control Station where the Doping Control Officer, via their passport, verifies their identity.

25.4 Depending on the circumstances, the Doping Control Officer may, at his or her discretion, decide not to allow a representative to accompany the athlete into the Doping Control Station.

25.5 Only one competitor at a time shall be called into the consulting area.

25.6 In addition to the competitor and his/her accompanying person, only the following persons may be present in the consulting area:

1. The CER, or his representative;

2. The Doping Control Officer;

3. The ASCP;

4. The Doping Control Technical Officer

representative of the Provincial Association concerned;

6. An interpreter, if required; and

7. An athlete’s escort.

25.7 The Doping Control Station shall contain a supply of:

1 Disposable collection vessels (contained in bags);

2. Disposable Urine Control Kits (contained in bags);

3. Disposable Partial Sample Kits (contained in bags).

25.8 Upon entering the collection station, the athlete will provide photo identification and/or a client representative/site coordinator will identify the athlete and the athlete will officially enter the station.

25.9 The athlete will select a sealed collection beaker from a supply of such.

25.10 A collector, serving as validator, will monitor the furnishing of the specimen by observation in order to assure the integrity of the specimen until a volume of at least 90 mL is provided.

25.11 Validators who are of the same gender as the athlete must observe the voiding process and should be members of the official drug-testing crew. The procedure does not allow for validators to stand outside the immediate area or outside the restroom. The athlete must urinate in full view of the validator (validator must observe flow of urine). The validator must request the athlete raise his/her shirt high enough to observe the midsection area completely ruling out any attempt to manipulate or substitute a sample.

25.12 Athletes may not carry any item other than his/her beaker into the restroom when providing a specimen. Any problem or concern should be brought to the attention of the collection crew chief or client representation for documentation. Athletes will rinse and dry hands, with water only, prior to urination.

25.13 Once a specimen is provided, the athlete is responsible for keeping the collection beaker closed and controlled.

25.14 Fluids and food given to athletes who have difficulty voiding must be from sealed containers (approved by the collector) that are opened and consumed in the station. These items must be caffeine- and alcohol-free and free of any other banned substances.

25.15 If the specimen is incomplete, the athlete should remain in the collection station until the sample is complete. If the athlete needs to leave the collection station for an approved reason they will package the partial specimen as outlined in the partial specimen protocal (Article 37).The partial sample is to be sealed and kept in the collection room with the collector. The athlete may leave the collection station if approved by the collector or CBBF representative.

25.16 Once an adequate volume of the specimen is provided, the collector who monitored the furnishing of the specimen by observation will sign that the specimen was directly validated and a collector will check the specific gravity.

25.17 If the urine has a specific gravity below 1.005 (1.010 if measured with a reagent strip), the specimen will be discarded by the athlete. The athlete must remain in the collection station until another specimen is provided. The athlete will provide another specimen.

25.18 If the urine has a specific gravity above 1.005 (1.010 if measured with a reagent strip) the specimen will be processed and sent to the laboratory.

25.19 The laboratory will make final determination of specimen adequacy.

25.20If the laboratory determines that an athlete’s specimen is inadequate for analysis, at the client’s discretion, another specimen may be collected at a later date.

25.21 If an athlete is suspected of manipulating specimens (e.g., via dilution), the client will have the authority to perform additional tests on the athlete.

25.22Once a specimen has been provided that meets the on-site parameters, the athlete will select a specimen collection kit and a uniquely numbered Chain of Custody Form from a supply of such. (until SCAN3® is utilized) 25.23 A collector will record the specific gravity and pH values if this procedure is used. 25.24 The collector will pour approximately 60 mL of the specimen into the “A vial” and the remaining amount (approximately 20 mL) into the “B vial”, which will be shipped to a WADA accredited laboratory – SMRTL) in the presence of the athlete.

25.25The collector will place the cap on each vial in the presence of the athlete; the collector will then seal each vial in the required manner under the observation of the athlete and witness (if present). 25.26 Vials and forms (if any) sent to the laboratory shall not contain the name of the athlete.

25.27 All sealed specimens will be secured in a shipping case. The collector will prepare the case for forwarding.

25.28 The athlete, collector and witness (if present) will sign certifying that the procedures were followed as described in the protocol. Any deviation from the procedures must be described and recorded. If deviations are alleged, the athlete will be required to provide another specimen.

25.29 After the collection has been completed, the specimens will be forwarded to the laboratory and copies of any forms forwarded to the designated persons (DFS).

25.30 The specimens become the property of the client

25.31 If the athlete does not comply with the collection process, the collector will notify the client

25.32 Representative/site coordinator and third party administrator responsible for management of the drug-testing program.

Article 26 – Transportation of Samples to the Laboratory At the completion of the sample collection session, all samples will be transported in a secure mode to the designated WADA accredited laboratory. 26.1

Article 27 – Facility

27.1 The Doping Control Station should be located in close proximity (within walking distance) to the site at which the doping control selections are taking place
At the same time, the Doping Control Station should be set aside from the general traffic flow to maintain security.

The Doping Control Station should be clearly marked with signs.

27.2 Ideally, the Doping Control Station should be divided into three separate, but interconnected areas (preferably three rooms). These areas are: a. Waiting Room This room should be large enough to accommodate athletes, accompanying team officials, doping control personnel, and escorts. The room should have chairs or benches and tables. An adequate supply of suitable individually sealed drinks and perhaps some reading material. Only authorized Doping Control Station personnel, athletes undergoing doping control procedures and one team official per athlete should be admitted. There should be security at the door to control access. b. Working Room (or Consulting Area) This area must have controlled access. Only doping control officials, the athlete and a team official will be allowed access to this area. It should contain a table, some chairs, a washbasin, the sample containers, suitable material for sealing the containers, writing material and a lockable cooler, refrigerator, or freezer for the storage of samples.

The working room is used for the following procedures:

 Securely storing the doping control supplies;

 Athlete’s selection of containers;

 Processing and sealing of containers;

 Packaging and storage of samples; and

 Signing of official documents c. Lavatory This room should contain a sink and toilet and should be connected to the working room. It should be large enough for the athlete and a witness to move freely.

Article 28 – Equipment

The equipment used in the Doping Control Station is classified into two groups: Doping Control Equipment and Facility Equipment. This equipment should be purchased/collected and set up before the doping control selection or competition day. 28.1 The Doping Control Equipment consists of items used in the collection, processing and sealing of the samples. The assigned Doping Control Officer or ASCP will normally bring this material to the doping control site.

28.2 The Facility Equipment consists of items used to set up the Doping Control Station where the samples for testing will be collected. It also relates to the items needed to make the athletes comfortable. The following list will assist organizers in planning for the Doping Control Station:

 Fluids (individual, sealed, non-caffeinated beverages; no alcoholic beverages should be provided in the Doping Control Station);

 Cups;

 Refrigerator, freezer or cupboard (lockable, to secure samples);

 Refrigerator or cooler (to keep drinks cold);

 Directional signage, posters;

 Garbage bags;

 Cleaners, toilet paper, paper towels and soap;

 Name tags, identification cards or armbands to identify Station personnel;

 Tables and chairs, or benches;

 Paper, pencils, pens, tape, clipboards, and scissors;\Reading material; and

 Meals for doping control personnel in accordance with the sport’s policy for officials Note: preparation of the facility and collection of the proper and necessary equipment well in advance will help to ensure the smooth operation of the Doping Control Station

Article 29 – Laboratory Responsibilities, Reporting Timelines and Procedures for Reporting Results

These procedures may be varied in accordance with the doping control procedures of a Provincial Association where applicable and if requested by the Provincial Association.

29.1 All samples collected under the auspices of the CBBF will remain the exclusive property of the CBBF. At CBBF-sanctioned Provincial or CBBF Events, regardless of the organization requesting or paying for the doping control, the CBBF shall retain the original copy of the Doping Control Form and shall be a recipient of the Certificate of Analysis from the laboratory. Copies of the certificate are sent to the IFBB and the World Doping Agency.

29.2 The laboratory shall analyze the “A” samples within an agreed time however, in any case, not later than fifteen (15) working days following the delivery to the laboratory of the “A” samples. In the case of technical problems, the Head of the Laboratory shall inform the CER and the CBBF Chairperson of Operations and Drug Control, who shall have the authority to extend this period.

29.3 In the event that the “A” sample is suspicious or problematic as to volume, adequacy, or suitability, the Head of the Laboratory shall inform the CER and the CBBF Chairperson of Operations and Drug Control. This person may request that a further sample be obtained. In the event that a further sample is requested, it shall be obtained in accordance with this Program.

29.4 Upon completion of the analysis, the Head of the Laboratory shall deliver to the CER and CBBF Chairperson of Operations and Drug Control, a Certificate of Analysis (or Doping Control Report).

29.5 A Certificate of Analysis from the WADA accredited laboratory is prima facie evidence of the doping control test results and is proof of the statements contained in the certificate.

Article 30 – Result Management

30.1 If the CBBF determines that a doping offence has occurred, the CBBF and/or the athlete’s Provincial Association shall immediately be notified in writing, via an Official Letter of Notification. The athlete shall immediately be notified as set out below. For the purpose of notification, the CBBF considers that a facsimile transmission, directed to the President or General Secretary of the Provincial Association, shall be sufficient.

30.2 The notification from the CBBF shall: 1. Be in writing;

2. State the event, venue, and date of the doping offence

3. State the nature of the doping offence e.g. positive test result of the “A” sample, code number, and disclosure of prohibited substance(s);

4. State the sanctions that are to be imposed on the athlete;

5. Advise the athlete of his or her rights of protest and

6. Include a copy of the Doping Control Form and Certificate of Analysis.

Note: For a refusal or failure, or for a manipulation, the Letter of Notification may be amended as necessary.

31.3 – Determination of Doping Offence Process

1. The CBBF Vice Chairperson of Operations and Drug Control (VCOD) shall be responsible for the determination if a doping offence has been committed and the imposition of penalties. After a sample has been analyzed by the WADA certified laboratory, any adverse analytical A sample findings will be reported to the VCOD. Any other allegation of a doping offence would be reported to the VCOD.

2. Upon notification, the VCOD shall forward the information to the athlete or other individual(s) alleged to have committed the doping offence in writing, either by confirmed delivery post, facsimile or electronic mail. The VCOD will set out the allegation and ask the athlete or other individual(s) for an explanation respecting the allegation. In addition, the athlete or other individual(s) would be advised of the potential penalty for the doping offence, that they are suspended pending the determination of the investigation and any subsequent appeal and whether they are requesting that the B sample be analyzed.

3. Any explanation of the alleged doping offence, or any request for a B sample analysis, must be provided to the VCOD in writing within a 14 day period after receipt of the notification.

4. If the explanation is accepted, no further discipline would be pursued and the interim suspension would be lifted. If the explanation is not accepted, if none is offered or received by the VCOD, or if no request is made for B
sample analysis and the VCOD determines that a doping offence has been committed, he or she shall impose an appropriate penalty.

5. If the athlete has requested that the B sample be analyzed, he or she shall be responsible for any costs associated with that analysis and the WADA certified laboratory may delay testing until payment is made. If the B sample analysis does not confirm the A sample result, no further discipline would be pursued. If the analysis confirms the VCOD will notify the athlete and impose an appropriate penalty.

6. The VCOD is obliged to treat the athlete or other individual(s) fairly and to conduct the investigation accordingly.

7. The VCOD’s decision respecting paragraphs 4 or 5 shall be in writing and provided to the athlete or other individual(s) as the case may be within 5 days, either by confirmed delivery post, facsimile or electronic mail. The VCOD shall also notify the athlete or other individual(s) of their right to appeal the decision.

8. Any appeal of the VCOD’s decision shall be in writing and must be made within 30 days of the date of the decision. The appeal must be accompanied by certified payment of a $500.00 fee. If the appeal is successful, this fee will be refunded.

9. No appeal respecting sample analysis may be initiated by the athlete until after the athlete has requested B sample analysis and that analysis has confirmed the A sample result.

31.4 – Appeals

1. The CBBF Chairperson and all Provincial Association Presidents or their designate comprise the CBBF’s Anti-Doping Appeal Committee (ADAC). Any appeals will be heard by a three person panel from the ADAC’s membership assigned to it by the CBBF Chairperson. The ADAC’s mandate is to determine whether or not a doping offence has been committed and if so, to apply the sanctions set out in this Program.

2. The ADAC panel is obliged to treat the athlete or other individual(s) fairly and to conduct its deliberations accordingly. The party appealing may provide further information to the ADAC panel in writing or verbally, if approved by the ADAC panel. The ADAC panel may conduct further investigation as it deems necessary.

3. At the discretion of the ADAC, the appeal panel may meet in person, or by teleconference. The party appealing may appear before the panel in person if the panel is meeting in that format or by telephone otherwise, if he or she requests to do so, but any costs for doing so shall be borne by the person appealing.

4. No Provincial Association President or his or her designate is eligible to sit on a panel involving a doping allegation respecting one of their Association’s members

. 31.5 – Penalties 1. For a first offence involving Anabolic Agents, Diuretics, Peptide Hormones, Mimetics, Markers and Analogues, and/or Pharmacological,
Chemical, or Physical Manipulation of the urine, the athlete will immediately be suspended for a period between 2 to 4 years. For a second offence, the athlete will immediately be suspended for life.

2. For a first offence involving Prohibited Substances and Methods other than those listed above, the athlete will immediately be suspended for a period of 3 to 6 months. A second offence will result in a 2-year suspension; a third offence will result in a lifetime suspension.

3. A refusal or failure to follow proper doping control procedures will be treated the same as a Doping Offence and will result in a 2-year suspension for a first offence, and a lifetime suspension for a second offence.

4. The sanction for any athlete, coach, trainer, judge, official, administrator or other person found guilty of dealing or trafficking in prohibited substances or methods shall be a lifetime suspension for a first offence

31.6 The CBBF reserves the right to publish the name of any athlete for failing to comply with this Program.

31.7 Provincial Associations are solely responsible for remaining current with the Program and for advising their athletes accordingly.

31.8 Where an athlete is found to have committed a doping offence, or during an interim suspension pending investigation or appeal, that member will, for the duration of the sanction:

1. Be ineligible to compete in any CBBF-sanctioned or IFBB-sanctioned or IOC-recognized international amateur event or any event sanctioned by any Provincial Association;

2. Be ineligible to compete in any sport for which WADA is recognized as its anti-doping control body.

3. Be prohibited from giving seminars or exhibitions;

4. Be ineligible for any position within the IFBB to include judge, coach, organizer, administrator or other official;

5. Have any awards, medals, certificates, and placings won on or after the date of the doping offence withdrawn; and

6. Be ineligible to apply for IFBB Professional Status.

Article 32 – IFBB Notification

32.1 The CBBF shall notify the IFBB of any decision made with respect to the investigation and findings respecting doping offences and any penalties imposed as a result.

Article 33 – Awards and Medals

The CBBF is committed towards protecting the integrity of the placings that are awarded to the top three finalists at its CBBF World Qualifier 33.1 Where an athlete has tested positive and found guilty of committing a doping offence, he or she shall be stripped of their medal, award or certificate, as
the case may be, and that medal shall be re-awarded to the appropriate finalist only if that finalist has been drug tested and has returned a negative test result. 33.2 The CBBF, in cooperation with the organizing committee and Provincial Associations, will attempt to re-distribute any awards, such as trophies, medals, and/or certificates, to their rightful owners, after the event.

Article 34 – Publishing of Doping Control Results

34.1 By way of deterrence, the CBBF reserves the right to publish the results of any doping control tests conducted at any of its sanctioned events. This publication may include the name and province of the athlete, the prohibited substances and/or methods found as a result of the doping offence, and a statement that any medals, awards, certificates and/or placings, won on or after the urine collection date, have been forfeited.

Article 35 – Interpretation

35.1 It is recognized that these guidelines cannot encompass every possible situation wherein written guidance might be sought in the resolution of an issue. In such cases, the CBBF Chairperson shall have the sole authority to interpret any matter arising out of these guidelines, or any matter not encompassed by these guidelines, said interpretation to be final and binding.

35.2 Should interpretation be necessary, the CBBF Chairperson may, at his discretion, seek advice from other members of the CBBF Executive Council. The CBBF Chairperson may also appoint an “ad hoc” committee to deliberate and decide upon any issue arising from these guidelines.

Article 36 – Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE)

36.1 A TUE application will only be considered by the CBBF under the following circumstances:

1. The athlete would experience a significant impairment to health if the prohibited substance or method were to be withheld in the course of treating an acute or chronic medical condition.

2. The use of the prohibited substance or method would produce no additional enhancement of performance other than that which might be anticipated by a return to a state of normal health following the treatment of a legitimate medical condition; and

3. There are no reasonable therapeutic alternatives or other alternatives are ineffective.

4. The CBBF has confirmed the above circumstances in consultation with a duly qualified medical practitioner. Examples include:

1. Insulin for the treatment of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus;

2. Beta-2 Agonist inhaler, such as terbutaline, for the treatment of asthma; and

3. Methylphenidate for the treatment of ADD or ADHD.

36.2 TUEs granted by the CBBF is valid for the duration of the treatment as prescribed by the physician, up to a maximum of four years. It is the athlete’s responsibility to know when the TUE expires and to apply for renewal before this date if necessary.

36.3 All athletes who are subject to doping control must be aware of the TUE rules and requirements that apply to them. These rules and requirements will vary depending on the athlete’s level of competition and will determine when and to which organization an athlete must submit a TUE application.

Article 37 – Partial Specimen Packaging Protocol
1. The partial urine specimen must remain in the collection beaker.

2. The athlete will select a set of specimen seals provided from a supply of such.

3. The set of specimen seals includes five bar code seals (a seal for the A vial, a seal for the B vial, a shipping box seal, a seal for the Specimen Processing Form and a seal for the athlete’s copy of the Specimen Processing Form) and one blank extra seal.

4. The collector will place a Specimen Processing Form bar code seal on the white and pink copy of the Specimen Processing Form.

5. The collector will have the athlete initial the blank extra seal and place it on the beaker containing the partial specimen in such a way that the act of opening the beaker would cause the seal to be broken.

6. The collector will place the sealed beaker in the larger compartment of the plastic shipping bag.

7. The collector will seal the plastic bag in the same manner it is sealed for shipping of a complete specimen.

8. The collector will have the athlete initial a tamper evident seal placed on the bag in such a way that any subsequent seal breakage or tampering would be evident to the athlete.

9. The sealed, initialed specimen will remain with the collector in the collection site.

10. After the athlete returns to the collection site, the athlete will show his/her identification to the collector, inspect the bag containing the beaker to ensure it is his specimen and inspect the tamper evident seal on the beaker. If the athlete is satisfied that the bag and seal are unbroken and tamper-free, the athlete will then provide additional urine in the beaker according to the established protocol.

11. In the event that the athlete elects to provide a new specimen, the initial specimen will be discarded.

12. In the event that the athlete does not provide the required 85 mL specimen and must leave the collection station for an approved reason again, the collector will begin with step 1 of this partial specimen protocol until the required 85 mL specimen is obtained.

13. Once the required 85 mL specimen is obtained, the collector will package the specimen in the usual manner for shipping to the laboratory.

14. The athlete will sign his name on the SCAN device indicating that all processing and packaging protocols were followed, including this partial specimen packaging protocol, and that the specimen is his/her urine with no evidence of tampering.

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